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project // ruffled stitching pouch

Ruffled Stitching Pouch


A couple months ago (has it really been that long?) I shared how to make a super simple stitching pouch to hold your embroidery work. It's the kind of thing that you probably want more than one of, because, let's face it...we all have a bunch of things that we're working on at any given time.

This time around I've made a pouch that has a little ruffle that not only looks cute, but also serves as an extra means of keeping everything safe and sound inside. Oh, and I made it from the CUTEST fabric from Wee Gallery for Dear Stella and added some embroidery embellishment!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

The outside fabric is called Alphabet and the lining and ruffle are Hearts in blue, from the same line. The Hearts print reminds me of my childhood and makes me so happy!

To make your own ruffled stitching pouch, here's what you need:

2 Fabrics - 1/4 yard each (fat quarters work!)
Fusible interfacing - 19 x 9.5 inches
Embroidery floss
Needle and thread
Scissors
Iron
Sewing Machine
Pins
Rotary cutter and mat (optional)

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

From each of the two fabrics, cut a piece that is 19 x 9.5 inches. From the fabric you're using for the ruffle, cut a piece that is 12 x 2.5. If your fabrics go one way, be sure to pay attention to the direction.

On my fabric, I added some stitching to some of the alphabet letters as well as to a few details. If you're doing this too, keep the stitching in from the edges a bit.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Iron the fusible interfacing onto the back of the fabric for the outside of the pouch.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Fold the ruffle strip in half lengthwise, with right sides together. Sew the two ends together with an 1/8-inch seam allowance. Now, turn the ruffle right side out and press the fold.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

With the needle and thread, stitch a line of running stitch close to the raw edge of the ruffle. Pull the stitches to gather the ruffle until it is just under 8 inches wide. Secure the thread with a good knot so it stays in place.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Pin the ruffle onto the center of one of the short ends of the outside piece of fabric. Space the gathers as evenly as you can.

Keep in mind that the end of the fabric you use will be the top of the opening for the pouch. Also, the side of the ruffle that is facing down will be the side that shows, so again, if the fabric is directional, this is important to watch for!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Machine baste the ruffle to the outside fabric piece using a 1/8-inch seam allowance.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Pin the lining fabric on top of the outside piece, right sides together. Fold the edges of the ruffles in so they don't get caught in the seams.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Starting at the short end that is opposite from the ruffle, sew around the pouch, leaving an opening for turning.

I used a 1/4-inch seam allowance, but then I trimmed the seams down to 1/8-inch and clipped the corners to help reduce bulk. The opening for turning, however, is still 1/4-inch.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Turn the pouch right side out and poke the corners out with a chopstick or similar object. Fold in the edges of the opening and pin the seam closed as shown.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Top stitch the two short ends with a 1/8-inch seam allowance. It looks nice and finished...and it closes the opening!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Fold the ruffled end down by about 1-1/2 inches (this isn't to exact!), and fold the bottom end up to meet the edge where the ruffle is coming out. Pin the sides and sew them together with a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Now your stitching pouch is ready to be put to use!

The only thing I would have changed on mine is the fabric direction. The Alphabet print does have these super sweet items in all directions, but it tends to go more one way than the others. In my head, I thought it would be best if the large area of the bag (the back) had things mainly upright. Now that it's finished, I wonder if I should have switched that around. Ah well...I love it no matter which way I turn it!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Because the ruffle is not as wide as the pouch, it allows you to very easily slide your work inside, then it pops right back out to cover the opening!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

All of the little details in this fabric have me in love! I'm pretty sure there will be more embroidery projects with this Wee Gallery print in my future!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Happy Stitching! And thanks to Dear Stella for providing such joy-filled fabric!

project // embroidered portrait frame

Embroidered Portrait Frame


I love making projects that use a little bit of embroidery! Sometimes I use something I stitched a while ago, and sometimes I stitch something new, but just incorporating embroidery in some way is wonderful to me.

Today I'm sharing this embroidered portrait in a felt frame. If you follow me on Instagram or Twitter you've probably seen some peeks at this fabric I've been working with, and I'll have more fun to show you all week. The fabric line is called Wild, and it was designed by Wee Gallery for Dear Stella. I've added some stitching (the patterns will be available later this week...keep watching!), and framed it with felt.

To make your own wall hanging (with a fabulous fox or other design inside), here's what you need:

Wool blend felt
Embroidery
Fusible interfacing
Embroidery floss
Ribbon

Frame Template PDF

Embroidered Portrait Frame

From felt, cut out two frame pieces: one solid, and one with the center cut out.

Embroidered Portrait Frame

Use the template to stitch the hearts in the corners of the front frame piece with the center cut out. Since it's just a small amount of embroidery, I used my printed template. It's pretty easy to tear away when you're done stitching.

Embroidered Portrait Frame

Cut an 8-inch piece of ribbon and stitch the two ends onto the solid back piece of the frame as shown.

Embroidered Portrait Frame

Grab your embroidery and trim it down to about 3-3/4 x 5 inches. Of course, you can resize the frame or make your own...just be sure that your embroidery ends up large enough so there is plenty of overlap with the front frame piece.

Embroidered Portrait Frame

To give your wall art some extra stability, iron fusible interfacing (the single-sided kind) to the back of your embroidery.

Embroidered Portrait Frame

Place your embroidery behind the front frame piece and stitch around the opening with running stitch. You may find it helpful to pin it as you work so that it doesn't shift or make your foxy embroidery crooked.

Embroidered Portrait Frame

Layer the back piece of the frame behind the front so that the ribbon ends are hidden inside the layer. Stitch around the outside with running stitch.

Embroidered Portrait Frame
Embroidered Portrait Frame

Now your portrait is ready to hang! Can you just imagine a grouping of these? I think they make great little gifts and would look so fun hanging in a nursery!

Embroidered Portrait Frame
Embroidered Portrait Frame
Embroidered Portrait Frame

Thanks to Dear Stella for the fantastic fabric to fill my frame!

birthday giveaway on yellow bird + yellow beard



This month, Janee from Yellow Bird + Yellow Beard is celebrating her birthday! Happy Birthday, Janee! To mark this happy occasion, she has organized a great big giveaway where you can win a $600 Visa gift card. What?!? That's pretty great, right?

I'm one of the group of sponsors helping to make this happen, and it's my immense pleasure to be part of this. So...you can hop over to Yellow Bird + Yellow Beard, check out all of the lovely people who are sponsoring the giveaway below, and enter for a chance to win! Enter using Rafflecopter on Janee's blog or below.

Good Luck, and Best Birthday Wishes to Janee!

giveaway group


a Rafflecopter giveaway

project // butterfly needle book

Butterfly Needle Book


I promised lots of butterfly treats this month, and I'm worried that today's project will be tough to beat. This darling little needle book has me entirely smitten. And since I lose needle books almost as often as I lose needles, I can always use another to try and keep on hand!

Butterfly Needle Book

Here's what you need:

Linen (or a solid fabric)
Print fabric (a square from a charm pack will work!)
Fusible interfacing (medium weight, single sided)
Felt (wool or wool blend will make your needles happy!)
Embroidery floss
Sew-on snaps
Iron
Scissors
Sewing machine
Needle and thread

Butterfly Needle Book PDF Template

NOTE: This makes a petite needle book, which I like for a variety of reasons...one being that I could use my 5-inch square of hexagon fabric! You may want to enlarge the template by 125-150 percent on a copier/scanner for a more standard-sized book.

Butterfly Needle Book

Here's what you do:

Iron the interfacing to the back of the linen and print fabrics. To save on waste, cut the fabrics and interfacing into rectangles that are just a bit larger than the wing cover template.

Butterfly Needle Book

Cut one wing cover piece from the print fabric and one from the linen. Add some embroidery embellishment to the linen wing piece if you'd like. I went with a few simple lazy daisy flowers on one side, but you could add a lot more. Just be sure to keep your stitching in from the edge by at least 1/2 inch to be safe.

Butterfly Needle Book

Pin the two wing pieces right sides together and sew around the edge leaving an opening for turning. I'd suggest leaving about 2 inches for the opening. Mine was smaller and though I got it turned, it was close!

Clip the curves so they end up nice and pretty when this goes right side out.

Butterfly Needle Book

Turn the wings right side out and gently push all those curves out. Then, stitch the opening closed using ladder stitch.

Butterfly Needle Book

Stitch around the edge of the wing shape with running stitch and contrasting thread. Why? Because I think running stitches are cute.

Butterfly Needle Book

Cut out two wing page pieces from felt and cut two body pieces from felt. Embroider a face onto one of the body pieces.

Butterfly Needle Book
Butterfly Needle Book

Layer one of the body pieces, the wing cover, and the two wing pages so they are all centered up as best as you can. Using running stitch, sew the layers together by hand.

Butterfly Needle Book

After you've stitched down the middle, go back and fill in the those stitches with more running stitch. Doubling up makes it stronger, and actually, at this point, the stitching is called "holbein stitch". Tie it off with a knot on the outside/body, because it will get hidden away.

Butterfly Needle Book
Butterfly Needle Book

Place the embroidered body piece on the first body piece and stitch around the edge with running stitch. As long as you keep the wings folded together, you should have very little trouble only going through the felt.

Butterfly Needle Book

Sew a snap onto the top and bottom of the wings, right at the edge.

Tips: 1. Use a small needle so it fits through the holes of the snaps. 2. Stitch carefully so you don't sew through to the outside. 3. Make sure you sew the snaps on in the right direction. (Yes, I messed this up on my first round!)

Technically, you could sew these on before you put the wing cover together, but I prefer the control of getting them placed just right, even if it makes the sewing a little trickier.

Butterfly Needle Book

Now your needle book is ready to be filled up with needles!

Butterfly Needle Book

It would be weird for me to flap the wings and make my needle book fly around the house a bit, right? Yeah, um, I didn't do that.

Butterfly Needle Book
Butterfly Needle Book

Like I said, this is a petite needle book, but I find it to be so precious that I can't imagine that I would allow it to get lost. And since I prefer to have only a few needles going at a time (with the rest secured in their packaging), the size should work just find for me.

Plus, I got to use some of my hexagon fabric, which might have been the inspiration for the hexagon on this month's calendar. You know, because I may have planned this all out from the beginning...

Butterfly Needle Book